Contribution starting at $2,195
Exported from Streamline App (https://app.streamlineicons.com)
7+ days (avg. $314 a day) Includes accommodations, food, and all related research costs
Ocean Health

Restoring Coral Reefs in Bali

Location
Kubu, North Bali, Indonesia Map it
Lead Scientist
Activity Level
Very Active
Accommodations
Dormitory-style accommodations
Internet access
Food
Chef-prepared meals
Special diets accommodated
Help researchers investigate whether artificial reef structures can mimic natural coral communities, thereby preserving the biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human communities that rely on coral reefs.
Earthwatch participants will snorkel (or scuba dive) over both artificial and natural reefs to record the coral, algae, sponges, gastropods, and urchins in quadrats on the reefs.
Bali lies within the ‘coral triangle,’ an area recognized as the global center of marine biodiversity, and its reefs support a dazzling array of wildlife.
Earthwatch participant may collect water and sediment samples at different points along the reef structures, which will be used to analyze the available nutrients within the different communities.
 Today, the reefs are part of a Marine Protected Area (MPA) that helps to safeguard them by preventing fishing and other human activities.
The small village of Kubu in northern Bali is home to a large community of fishermen who rely on healthy coral reefs to serve as a habitat for fish species.
Help researchers investigate whether artificial reef structures can mimic natural coral communities, thereby preserving the biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human communities that rely on coral reefs.
Help researchers investigate whether artificial reef structures can mimic natural coral communities, thereby preserving the biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human communities that rely on coral reefs.
Earthwatch participants will snorkel (or scuba dive) over both artificial and natural reefs to record the coral, algae, sponges, gastropods, and urchins in quadrats on the reefs.
Bali lies within the ‘coral triangle,’ an area recognized as the global center of marine biodiversity, and its reefs support a dazzling array of wildlife.
Earthwatch participant may collect water and sediment samples at different points along the reef structures, which will be used to analyze the available nutrients within the different communities.
 Today, the reefs are part of a Marine Protected Area (MPA) that helps to safeguard them by preventing fishing and other human activities.
The small village of Kubu in northern Bali is home to a large community of fishermen who rely on healthy coral reefs to serve as a habitat for fish species.
Help researchers investigate whether artificial reef structures can mimic natural coral communities, thereby preserving the biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human communities that rely on coral reefs.

Coral reefs around the world are rapidly disappearing due to climate change and other human impacts. Help researchers investigate whether artificial reef structures can mimic natural coral communities, thereby preserving the biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human communities that rely on coral reefs.


On this expedition, you’ll not only witness the destruction that is plaguing reefs all around the world, but you’ll also have the opportunity to contribute to efforts to preserve the biodiversity and ecosystem functions reefs provide. | Earthwatch

The small Indonesian island of Bali is known for its spectacular forested volcanoes, ancient Hindu temples, and breathtaking beaches. But one of the most alluring draws of this island is just below the ocean’s surface. Bali lies within the ‘coral triangle,’ an area recognized as the global center of marine biodiversity, and its reefs support a dazzling array of wildlife. Over the last several decades, however, Bali’s reef ecosystems have been heavily degraded by destructive fishing practices, warming ocean temperatures, pollution, and other human activities. Now, they’re struggling to survive.

This decline is concerning not only because of the animals that rely on the reef habitats and the important ecosystem functions the reefs perform, but also for the local people who rely on these reefs for their livelihoods, including fishermen and tourism operators. To combat these impacts, scientists are investigating whether artificial reefs could be the answer to preserving biodiversity and ensuring local communities are resilient in the face of climate change.

While natural reef ecosystems can take thousands of years to grow and mature, artificial reefs can be made quickly from concrete and could potentially mimic the important ecological and socio-economic functions of natural reefs. You’ll snorkel or scuba dive* in a Marine Protected Area over both natural coral reefs and artificial reefs, surrounded by corals, sponges, reef fish, turtles, and rays to help researchers determine how closely fish communities, carbon cycling, and predator populations on artificial reefs match those on natural reefs.

On this expedition, you’ll not only witness the destruction that is plaguing reefs all around the world, but you’ll also have the opportunity to contribute to efforts to preserve the biodiversity and ecosystem functions reefs provide. With robust data on the benefits of these structures, the Indonesian government, and governments around the world, will be better able to protect marine biodiversity and safeguard the livelihoods of coastal communities.

*Note: Certification is required for participation on scuba teams. See project briefing for details.

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A Typical Itinerary

  • Day 1: Arrive
  • Days 2–3: Orientation & training
  • Days 3–6: Snorkel/dive surveys, deploy video units, analyze photo and video data
  • Day: 7 Depart

You also have the option of joining a two-week team.

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HOW YOU WILL HELP

When you arrive, you’ll be trained in species identification as well as survey methods. You’ll then use those skills to help researchers:

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Snorkel (or scuba dive if you’re a member of a scuba team) over artificial and natural reefs to survey biodiversity, take pictures, and collect nutrient samples.
Conduct reef surveys

Snorkel (or scuba dive if you’re a member of a scuba team) over artificial and natural reefs to survey biodiversity, conduct photo surveys, and collect nutrient samples (team-dependent).

Deploy baited remote underwater video (RUV) units from a boat. These video units attract fish and predators so you can record and monitor wildlife on reefs.
Deploy video units

Deploy remote underwater video (RUV) units to record and monitor wildlife on reefs.

Help evaluate the photos, videos, and water and nutrient samples you collect throughout your expedition and organize the data that has been collected.
Analyze project data

Help evaluate the photos, videos, and water and nutrient samples you collect throughout your expedition and organize the data that has been collected.

 

Field conditions and research needs can lead to changes in the itinerary and activities. We appreciate your cooperation and understanding.

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FEEDBACK & QUESTIONS

Have a question?

If your question is not answered by one of our FAQs, please reach out to us and we will answer your question as soon as we can.

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