Annual Report

Earthwatch is enormously grateful for the commitment of our donors and supporters. Thanks to you, we see great outcomes in the field, year on year, helping us work towards a sustainable environment.

 


 

Our annual reports highlight just a few of our successes each year as well as our recent financial reviews. Below you’ll find the highlights from our most recent Annual Report as well as a library of our annual reports and audited financial statements dating back to 2010.

2018 Annual Report Highlights

Building Capacity for a Healthier Planet

By collaborating with local communities, Earthwatch scientists and volunteers have helped to identify solutions to address major environmental challenges.

Effecting change at the local and global level requires more than data—it requires trust, dedication, and a consistent presence. Earthwatch’s unique model of supporting long-term research around the world enables scientists and volunteers to build partnerships within communities. 

Over the Past 10 Years 
  • Average of 7.77 years of Earthwatch support per project
  • 96.2 percent of Earthwatch projects have supported at least one community-engaging activity training, or employment opportunity
  • 91 projects included education or engagement with the local community
    • 47 projects provided direct outreach or educational activities to local community members
    • An additional 44 projects conducted both educational outreach and community engagement with the research
Earthwatch volunteers helped to observe the population sizes and behavior of the marine species in the area, carefully recording data that allowed scientists to ground-truth the importance of Golgo Dulce as a critical environment for marine life and fight for protections for this system.
A Whale of a Win

In the spring of 2018, the Costa Rican government announced an exclusion zone for heavy maritime traffic in Golfo Dulce, a narrow inlet on the southern Pacific coast of Costa Rica, which is a critical habitat for spotted and bottlenose dolphins as well as a breeding ground for humpback whales. This zone is a major step toward the conservation of humpback whales and other marine species in the Eastern Pacific and was informed by data collected by teams of Earthwatch researchers and volunteers on the expedition Marine Mammals and Predators in Costa Rica, led by Dr. Lenin Oviedo.

Volunteers helped to observe the population sizes and behavior of the marine species in the area, carefully recording data that allowed scientists to ground-truth the importance of Golgo Dulce as a critical environment for marine life and fight for protections for this system.

 

There’s another side to this story—the side of the local involvement. Earthwatch has been a platform for community members to actually get to work in safeguarding their home and empowering them to be owners of that natural heritage. It’s not only about whales and dolphins, it’s about humans and how they feel about whales and dolphins in Golfo Dulce

Dr. Lenin Oviedo, Marine Mammals and Predators in Costa Rica

Financial Documents

Be more than a tourist

Experience hands-on science in some of the most astounding locations in the world.
Meet a community of like-minded travelers and return home with stories filled with adventure.

Browse Expeditions

YOUR SUPPORT MATTERS

Earthwatch depends on donations—above and beyond what we raise from volunteers who participate on our expeditions—in order to deliver our global conservation mission. In fact, volunteer contributions provide only half of the total resources Earthwatch needs to sustain over 40 field research expeditions, a wide variety of educational programs, corporate sustainability trainings, and more each year.

Donate