STUDENTS TODAY AND CREATING THE LEADERS FOR TOMORROW
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STUDENTS TODAY AND CREATING THE LEADERS FOR TOMORROW

STUDENTS TODAY AND CREATING THE LEADERS FOR TOMORROW

The Indigenous program recently funded by Qantas for the first time and the non-Indigenous program, very generously funded by the George Alexander Foundation over the last eight years, provides these students the opportunity to see what scientific research is really like and to fulfil our mission of influencing a positive change in behaviour in the years to come. This year, students joined leading scientists on three exciting research projects around Australia.

Margaret Tran joined the Melbourne’s Microbats expedition in January 2016, that took students to rural Victoria to gather data on the impact of roads, light and sound on microbats’ movements, population changes or decline in numbers and their over-all health.

She said: “I am now super interested in scientific research after this experience and am gearing towards a career in either medicine or scientific / environmental research.”

One Indigenous student, Tyrell Roadley, from Muswelbrook - two hours North West of Newcastle NSW, said he was looking for a way to better connect with nature.

“It's a good deed helping the environment and animals living in these areas… and I believe that giving back to the earth is something that needs to be done on both a physical and spiritual level – it’s out of respect,” he said

Tyrell said the expedition provided him a better understanding of what we can do as humans to care for our environment and the species that inhabit it and rely on a healthy ecosystem for their survival.

By the end of the week, these students became field experts, taking GPS coordinates, setting up light equipment, non-invasive traps and other research equipment. They are left with a new understanding of how important the role of science is in conserving and preserving our environment.

The opportunity not only provides students the chance to deepen their understanding and appreciation of science and nature, but also to make life-long friends.

Margaret said she was interested in connecting and socialising with other students who shared the same passions and she’s now made friends for life.

However, getting closer to nature was the ‘icing on the cake’ for her.

“I now respect and understand the environment more than ever,” she said.

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