Contribution starting at $2,250
Exported from Streamline App (https://app.streamlineicons.com)
7+ days ($322 per day) Includes accommodations, food, and all related research costs
Wildlife & Ecosystems

Cracking the Code: the Mysteries of Native Bees in Utah

Location
Cedar Breaks National Monument Map it
Lead Scientist
Activity Level
Moderate
Accommodations
Single Rooms possible
Couples Rooms possible
Internet access
Food
Shared meals
Special diets accommodated

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This Earthwatch project has added safety measures to allow for responsible fielding of volunteers and field staff at this time.

COVID Ready

This project has added safety measures to allow for responsible fielding of volunteers and field staff at this time.

Those measures include

  • Decreased overall team size to allow for physical distancing
  • Face mask requirements
  • Single accommodations
  • Adjusted transportation arrangements
  • Increased cleaning and sanitization

When reading the Online Expedition Briefing, please keep these adjustments in mind.

Over 40 million acres of breathtaking public lands stretch across the varied landscapes of Utah, but little is known about the vast array of native bees reliant on this area and its governmental protections.
Throughout the towering red canyons, verdant evergreen forests, and vast deserts of Utah, over 1100 species of native bees and other pollinators are hard at work.
Earthwatch volunteers will collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.
Earthwatch volunteers will collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.
Bees and other pollinators will be collected by Earthwatch volunteers using pan traps (small bowls filled with soapy water that attracts bees) and using nets.
Earthwatch volunteers will work alongside a research team to track the biodiversity of these critical species, interpret the complex web of pollinator and plant interactions, and better predict how environmental stresses will affect different pollinator and plant species.
From the pristine alpine lakes to the sprawling volcanic fields to the trails meandering past the twisted bristlecone pines, you’ll work alongside a research team to track the biodiversity of these critical species.
Over 40 million acres of breathtaking public lands stretch across the varied landscapes of Utah, but little is known about the vast array of native bees reliant on this area and its governmental protections.
Throughout the towering red canyons, verdant evergreen forests, and vast deserts of Utah, over 1100 species of native bees and other pollinators are hard at work.
Earthwatch volunteers will collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.
Earthwatch volunteers will collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.
Bees and other pollinators will be collected by Earthwatch volunteers using pan traps (small bowls filled with soapy water that attracts bees) and using nets.
Earthwatch volunteers will work alongside a research team to track the biodiversity of these critical species, interpret the complex web of pollinator and plant interactions, and better predict how environmental stresses will affect different pollinator and plant species.
From the pristine alpine lakes to the sprawling volcanic fields to the trails meandering past the twisted bristlecone pines, you’ll work alongside a research team to track the biodiversity of these critical species.

Over 40 million acres of breathtaking public lands stretch across the varied landscapes of Utah, but little is known about the vast array of native bees reliant on this area and its governmental protections. How will these pollinators fare as non-native species, climate change, and other human influences alter the landscape?


By better understanding the vast network of species interactions that native bees and plants rely on, Earthwatch teams will help to inform these key management decisions.

Throughout the towering red canyons, verdant evergreen forests, and vast deserts of Utah, over 1100 species of native bees and other pollinators are hard at work. Ranging from chubby bumblebees to smaller species no bigger than the tip of your pen, these bees fly from plant to plant, taking with them samples of those plants’ pollen. But they’re also leaving something behind: DNA. As they pick up pollen, they shed some of their genetic material, turning each plant into a visitor book with each bee species leaving their signature.

Researchers know this record of pollinator and plant interactions exists, but they aren’t able to interpret it yet. Dr. Jackie Grant is working to change that by creating a reference database where researchers can look up the genetic signature of a bee and compare it to what they’ve found on a plant. This database will be particularly useful in southern Utah, where some scientists and commercial farmers are proposing to introduce invasive western honey bees to the pesticide-free protected lands in an effort to bolster plummeting populations. By better understanding the vast network of species interactions that native bees and plants rely on, Earthwatch teams will help to inform these key management decisions.

From the pristine alpine lakes to the sprawling volcanic fields to the trails meandering past the twisted bristlecone pines, you’ll work alongside a research team to track the biodiversity of these critical species, interpret the complex web of pollinator and plant interactions, and better predict how environmental stresses will affect different pollinator and plant species.

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A Typical Itinerary

  • DAY 1  Arrive, campus tour, drive to Brian Head
  • DAYS 2-5  Collect samples of native bees, plants, and other pollinators; sample processing
  • DAY 6  Restoration and conservation activities, including water sampling and native seed collection
  • DAY 7 Depart

*Volunteers on two-week teams will repeat this itinerary for the second week.

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HOW WILL YOU HELP

When you arrive, the researchers will provide you with information on working with pollinator species. You’ll spend your days exploring the striking woodlands of Utah, while participating in the following tasks:

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Earthwatch volunteers will collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.
Survey bee biodiversity

Collect bees from pan traps, identify native bee species, and collect vegetation and environmental data.

Earthwatch volunteers will help researchers collect four types of samples for genetic analysis: whole bees, pollen carried by bees, plant leaves, and flowers.
Collect DNA samples

You will help researchers collect four types of samples for genetic analysis: whole bees, pollen carried by bees, plant leaves, and flowers.

Earthwatch volunteers will assist with bumblebee acoustic by setting up and taking down Acoustic Recording Units in patches of pollinator rich habitat.
Assist with bumblebee acoustic surveys

By setting up and taking down Acoustic Recording Units in patches of pollinator rich habitat.

Field conditions and research needs can lead to changes in the itinerary and activities. We appreciate your cooperation and understanding.

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FEEDBACK & QUESTIONS

Have a question?

If your question is not answered by one of our FAQs, please reach out to us and we will answer your question as soon as we can.

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