Earthwatch Conservation News | Earthwatch News

Five years of FreshWater Watch

From the urban metropolis of Shanghai to the deserts of the United Arab Emirates and the wetlands of India, discover new insights into the key causes of water quality loss and ecosystem degradation both globally and locally, triggering important conservation actions, thanks to volunteers involved in FreshWater Watch.

Bringing Back the Bison

Tens of millions of wild bison once freely roamed across North America before they were hunted to near extinction. Today, Earthwatch, in partnership with the Blackfoot First Nation, is helping to prepare for the return of this iconic species.

Investigating Threats to Chimps in Uganda

Chimpanzees are an endangered species facing numerous anthropogenic threats. The 600 remaining chimps in the Budongo Forest Reserve of Uganda are threatened by poaching, habitat fragmentation, and an unexplained reduction in the abundance of fruiting trees. Earthwatch scientist Dr. Fred Babweteera and his team of field assistants are conducting a long-term study to determine the underlying causes of the reduction in fruiting trees, while simultaneously providing relief from the threat of poachers and deforestation.

Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Protect the Sharks of Belize

Since teaming up with fishermen and the Belize government to strengthen shark fishing regulations and monitoring marine reserves, shark enthusiast Dr. Demian Chapman is now engaging in the first study of its kind. Dr. Chapman is making efforts to measure how long an overfished shark population takes to recover in a newly produced marine reserve, Southwater Caye. He is also monitoring other ways that marine reserves affect sharks and their close cousins, the rays. To do this, he will rely on cutting-edge technology. Want to be part of the action?

Trees in the Tundra

At the southern edge of the Arctic, in Canada’s Hudson Bay lowlands, lies Churchill, Manitoba—a small town that sits at the convergence of tundra, forest, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Also known as the “polar capital of the world”, Churchill is located at the Arctic treeline, and is extremely sensitive to small environmental changes that have a huge impact on ecosystems. 
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